History

Strata - Portraits of Humanity - Nov'18

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(1) Dr. Chloe Duckworth, alias “ArchaeoDuck,” covers the archaeology behind a news story from 2016, about how iron from a meteorite was used to make a dagger found in an ancient Egyptian tomb. Plus awesome tips on researching and learning for free online! (2) This journey of beautiful art and nature showcases the grandeur of Ambajogai city in Maharashtra, India, which was a center of cultural developments around the 10th and 11th century. Seven inscriptions have come to light there, informing on the town structure and local cultural heritage.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Oct'18

This episode is currently not viewable online.

Hawthorne was a small community in Aiken County, South Carolina.   When the construction of the Savannah River Site nuclear reservation took place  in 1950, Hawthorne and its handful of residents had to be removed.  The climate of the times and the onset of the Cold War meant the end of this community.  As the years passed, Hawthorne and its story were lost.  This documentary combines interviews with two surviving residents, historical documents and photos, and archaeology to draw the viewer into this very tumultuous time.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Sep'18

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) The art of making the Lanzhou Waterwheel was all but lost in the 21st century. Duan Yicun, the 20th descendent of the original Chinese Yellow River Waterwheel inventor, struggles to compete in the modern waterwheel market and to pass on the heritage of his craft. (2) In a ceremony with much meaning to Shiite Muslims in Iran, but which has much more ancient origins, a group of traditional people in Shahrud, Semnan Province, perform their ablution a few hours before the start of Nowruz, the Iranian New Year.

Produced in 2018 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

In The Studio - All Aboard!

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Autumn Labbe-Renault hosts Anatasia Panagakos, Board President, and Ryan Baum, Board Secretary, both of Friends of Yolo County Archives.

friendsyca.org

topics discussed include:  what is housed in the archives; volunteers and donor contributions to the archive to keep it running; significance of archiving community history; how it contributes to recording current socio-political issues for the future; how to continue upkeep and investment in the archives.

Recorded 08/23/18.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Aug'18

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) This is a short documentary about the forging of a Javanese Gamelan gong, highlighting the rhythmic nature of the methods employed by traditional gamelan makers, including the firing, molding and tuning of a new bronze instrument. (2) The famous Bridge of Avignon, the subject if a wonderful children’s song, stops in the middle of the Rhone River. Abandoned centuries ago, it prompts questions. What happened to it? Why is there so little left? Where did it lead to? And what did it look like in all its glory?

Produced in 2018 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jul'18

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) In the eighth century, after centuries of trade contact, the Vikings set sail in their clinker-built ships to many parts of the world. Over a span of 300 years, they carried out raids, trade and migration all over Christian Europe and even more far-flung regions. (2) Native Americans from the Standing Rock Indian Reservation speak out on the Dakota Access Pipeline, the repetition of history and their roles as water-protectors in a struggle for modern sovereignty. This film examines the protests as well as the social consequences of pipeline construction.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jun'18

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) In 480 BC, Greek cities of Sicily soundly defeated a massive Carthaginian force at the first Battle of Himera. Himera then built the Temple of Victory and, in a unique event in the history of Greeks in Sicily, buried 10,000 riders with their horses. But in 409 BC, Himera was destroyed. (2) Tasiro is a wood carver who expertly creates traditional sculptures representing the Solomon Islands culture and reflecting the natural beauty of the environment that surrounds him. Dedicated to his craft, Tasiro uses carving as a means of supporting his family.