Strata: Portraits of Humanity

Strata: Portraits of Humanity is a monthly half-hour newsmagazine-style show.  Each episode of the human story is a portrait building on the many layers of the human experience.  This is a record we are just beginning to uncover.  From that perspective, Strata delivers in-depth coverage of a wide variety of archaeological and cultural heritage topics all around the world.

Details

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Mar'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) Dr. Chloe Duckworth, alias “ArchaeoDuck,” presents the latest in her "Meet the Archaeologist" series. Dayanna Knight is a talented artist and expert in Viking identity. Find out about how she combined her talents to create “The Viking Coloring Book.” (2) From the present to the past, a young woman and her brother trace the history of their ancestors through traditional stone carving in Shiraz, Iran, in the center of the ancient Persian homeland. Their journey takes them to Persepolis and monuments to revered Iranian poets.

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jun'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) Two episodes of Dr. Chloe Duckworth’s “ArchaeoDuck” series.  She compares the scant evidence analyzed by archaeology to a jigsaw puzzle and then explains how an archaeological site is formed and why archaeologists take it apart the way they do. (2) Archaeologist-filmmaker Adam Thompson puts forth a fascinating hypothesis to explain massive architectural features made of columnar basalt as far east as Nan Madol on Pohnpei.  Did Austronesian royal elite flee from Hindu expansion in Java and migrate to eastern Melanesia?

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - May'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) In a short comedy shot in 2003 in the fish collection at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles Coounty, Gail, a university student, arrives at the fish archives of the Museum with a mission to identify bones from a dig on Santa Catalina Island.  She has a surprising adventure!  (2) In Tauste, northern Spain, a church tower supposedly built with the church in the 13th century, turns out to be the minaret of a former mosque built in the 11th century.  This video documents the research that led to this surprising conclusion and the re-imagining of Tauste history.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Apr'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) Ancient Sumerian texts spoke of an enigmatic and distant country.  Its so-called “black ships,” loaded with riches and valuable minerals, arrived in the Mesopotamia via the maritime trading routes.  Archaeology now shows that the mythical country of Magan really did exist.  (2) Featuring 23 outstanding films selected from 107 entries, The Archaeology Channel International Film Festival is in its 16th year as a leading competition.  This preview offers a sample of the remarkably diverse topics and film styles represented by this year’s offerings.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Feb'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) This animated short film is an imaginative take on the ritual farewell of an old female shaman whose 12,000-year-old burial in an Israeli cave informs about the early development of religious beliefs. (2) New rock art designs w ere discovered recently around the Rock Art Archaeological Park of Campo Lameiro (PAAR) in Spain. The Galician Heritage Council conducted fieldwork on them in order to analyze and register the panel, record the presence of more panels around that vicinity and include them in the PAAR.

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jan'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

Built-in 1899 during the Spanish-American War as one of six fortifications designed to protect the southeastern American coastline, Fort Fremont closed out a 350-year-old legacy of coastal fortifications in Port Royal Sound, South Carolina. It is an artifact of homeland security spanning European colonization and 19th-century imperialism. This film documents how geography, technology, national security, and politics interacted to shape the fortunes of a community during the Spanish-American War.

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jun'18

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) In 480 BC, Greek cities of Sicily soundly defeated a massive Carthaginian force at the first Battle of Himera. Himera then built the Temple of Victory and, in a unique event in the history of Greeks in Sicily, buried 10,000 riders with their horses. But in 409 BC, Himera was destroyed. (2) Tasiro is a wood carver who expertly creates traditional sculptures representing the Solomon Islands culture and reflecting the natural beauty of the environment that surrounds him. Dedicated to his craft, Tasiro uses carving as a means of supporting his family.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Sep'18

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) The art of making the Lanzhou Waterwheel was all but lost in the 21st century. Duan Yicun, the 20th descendent of the original Chinese Yellow River Waterwheel inventor, struggles to compete in the modern waterwheel market and to pass on the heritage of his craft. (2) In a ceremony with much meaning to Shiite Muslims in Iran, but which has much more ancient origins, a group of traditional people in Shahrud, Semnan Province, perform their ablution a few hours before the start of Nowruz, the Iranian New Year.

Produced in 2018 by Archaeological Legacy Institute