Strata: Portraits of Humanity

Strata: Portraits of Humanity is a monthly half-hour newsmagazine-style show.  Each episode of the human story is a portrait building on the many layers of the human experience.  This is a record we are just beginning to uncover.  From that perspective, Strata delivers in-depth coverage of a wide variety of archaeological and cultural heritage topics all around the world.

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Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Feb'20

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) In this episode of the ArchaeoDuck series, Chloe Duckworth takes us to the National Museum of Denmark, where C. J. Thomsen in the 19th century began dividing prehistory into the Stone, Bronze and Iron ages.  (2) The Medieval castle of Caveirac in France today is part of the City Hall, so it is not individually discernable.  However, historical research, including 3D modeling, has enabled a better understanding and a virtual reconstruction of many of the stages of the castle throughout its history.

Produced in 2020 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jan'20

This episode is currently not viewable online.

Set on the grounds of a preserved Roman hippodrome, a group of performing legionnaires, gladiators and charioteers try to hang on to Jordan's ancient past.  Jerash is ancient Gerasa, a prosperous city of the Roman Empire.  But as tourism continues to decline in the Middle East, the performers are faced with the harsh reality that each show may be their last.  The documentary short “The Battle of Jerash” takes you for a bizarre ride in a place you never thought would feel the effects of its tumultuous region.

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Dec'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) In this episode of the ArchaeoDuck series, Chloe Duckworth takes us to the Roman Villa Borg in Germany, where Roman glass is being reconstructed in replica workshops by master glassblowers from around the world.  (2) Close to the Austrian border in northern Italy, the show’s hostess, Francesca Mazzalei, and Dr. Franco Marzatico explore the prehistory and history of the Alpine region of Trentino.  This is the second of two episodes, featuring ancient copper mining in the Bronze Age and silver mining in the Medieval Period.

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Nov'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) In this episode of the ArchaeoDuck series, Annelies Van de Ven lends us her expert take on archaeology and museums, and talks about some of the AMAZING fieldwork she has done as part of her research.  (2) Close to the Austrian border in northern Italy, the show’s hostess, Francesca, is instructed by Dr. Franco Marzatico on the prehistory of the Alpine region of Trento.  This is the first of two episodes, featuring Neanderthal and early Homo sapiens remains, stelae from the 3rd century BC and lake dwellers of the Neolithic.

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Oct'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1)  Dr. Chloe Duckworth, in her “ArchaeoDuck” vlog series, expounds on a glossary of archaeological terms, in this episode from Archaeometry to Geophysics.  (2) This film recounts the curious history of a 1st Century BC Egyptian mummy, covered in semi-legible hieroglyphs, which wound up in the “Library-Museum” of the village of Cazenovia in Madison County, New York.  The film covers the transport of this mummy to a nearby hospital for a series of CT scans, which determined the probable cause of death of the 19-25 year-old male named “Hen.”

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Sep'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1)  Dr. Chloe Duckworth, in her “ArchaeoDuck” series, suggests what to take when you're packing for archaeological fieldwork.  (2) In the mountains of northern Iraq, researchers from Heidelberg University employ drones and photogrammetry to document ancient Mesopotamian rock art, rock-hewn tombs and reliefs of ancient kings.  (3) Conductor Arash Fouladvand, historian of Persian Music, leads a London-based branch of the Bahar Peace Choir.  We follow Arash as he takes the choir through an 1100-year-old poem by the famous Persian poet, Rudaki.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jul'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) Dr. Chloe Duckworth, in her “ArchaeoDuck” series, interviews osteoarchaeologist Dr. Lauren McIntyre.  Learn all about human osteology via decapitated Vikings and underground crypts.  Find out what the job is really like.  (2) In the 17th century, Šibenik, vibrant Mediterranean community and the largest city of Venetian Dalmatia, is besieged by the Ottoman Turks.  The people of Šibenik, under the unlikely but competent leadership of a German aristocrat, have to dig themselves out of a hopeless situation.

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Mar'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) Dr. Chloe Duckworth, alias “ArchaeoDuck,” presents the latest in her "Meet the Archaeologist" series. Dayanna Knight is a talented artist and expert in Viking identity. Find out about how she combined her talents to create “The Viking Coloring Book.” (2) From the present to the past, a young woman and her brother trace the history of their ancestors through traditional stone carving in Shiraz, Iran, in the center of the ancient Persian homeland. Their journey takes them to Persepolis and monuments to revered Iranian poets.

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jun'19

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) Two episodes of Dr. Chloe Duckworth’s “ArchaeoDuck” series.  She compares the scant evidence analyzed by archaeology to a jigsaw puzzle and then explains how an archaeological site is formed and why archaeologists take it apart the way they do. (2) Archaeologist-filmmaker Adam Thompson puts forth a fascinating hypothesis to explain massive architectural features made of columnar basalt as far east as Nan Madol on Pohnpei.  Did Austronesian royal elite flee from Hindu expansion in Java and migrate to eastern Melanesia?

Produced in 2019 by Archaeological Legacy Institute