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Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Jun'21

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(1) Dr. Michele Koons, Curator of Archaeology at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, digs into the Museum collection drawers to tell us about some gorgeous shell bracelets from the prehistoric Hohokam culture in the American Southwest. (2) Canada's oldest army regiment, the Queen's York Rangers, traces its origins back to 1756 and the French and Indian War. In this film, follow the Rangers’ two-hundred-and-fifty-year journey from the American Revolution into the modern War On Terror as they continue to build their legacy.

Produced in 2021 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - May'21

This episode is currently not viewable online.

The Big Dig: Paisley Abbey 2019 documents an 8-week excavation, the latest phase in the long-term archaeological investigation of one of Scotland's most intriguing monuments, the Great Drain of Paisley Abbey. Extending 90 m, this finely crafted stone-lined 6-ft high conduit supposedly took waste from the Abbey complex to the White Cart River. This film shows professional archaeologists and community volunteers working to increase our knowledge of the Abbey precinct, the construction of the Drain itself, and its impact on the community.

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Apr'21

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(1) Dr. Chloe Duckworth, aka ArchaeoDuck, in her vlog tells us all about how and why archaeologists use aerial photography to find and interpret vanished archaeological sites. (2) This film, produced by the Digital Humanities Initiative at Hamilton College, New York, documents the field and lab research in Slocan Valley, British Columbia, since the year 2000. It explores the questions about and interpretations of the indigenous occupation of the Slocan Narrows, shedding light on the pre-colonial history of the valley.

Produced in 2021 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Strata: Portraits of Humanity - Mar'21

This episode is currently not viewable online.

(1) The Yam Festival, known in the local Ewe dialect as “Te Za,” is a harvest festival in the Asogli State in the Volta Region of Ghana. Colorfully combining music, dancing, feasting, and local crafts, this event celebrates family, farmers, culture, and unity. (2) Landing at today’s Tampa Bay in 1539, Hernando de Soto and his army sought gold and glory. 1540 he entered Chickasaw territory and claimed authority over them. The Chickasaw eventually overcame these unwelcome visitors, ending de Soto’s American expedition.

Produced in 2021 by Archaeological Legacy Institute

Peak Moment - The Resilient Gardener — Surviving and Thriving

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“We’ve had 50 years of unusually stable weather… What do we need to do now, to garden in times that are less predictable?” Plant breeder Carol Deppe, author of The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times, suggests growing a wider variety of crops adapted to conditions where you are; crops needing minimum inputs; and varying gardening patterns with the year. “Short season crops are a premium,” she asserts. She discusses seed saving, and storing enough seeds so everyone in your neighborhood can be gardening if need be.

Peak Moment - For Humans, Bugs and Beauty — An Urban Food Forest Demonstration

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“This place is famous. People loving coming by here because at any time of year you can get something to eat.” Architect Mark Lakeman, co-founder of the City Repair project, gives a tour of the corner sidewalk outside his Portland office building, where a food forest is bursting with life. A diagram shows where over 80 plants are located in six or seven vertical layers. Tall fruit trees, flowers, a grape arbor, herbs, berries, small vegetables, and ground cover are abundant.

Peak Moment - Share-It-Square - Creating Neighborhood Gathering Spaces

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Every year for the past two decades, the neighbors near Sherrett Street in southwest Portland repaint their colorful street intersection. Resident Mighk Simpson gives us a tour on painting day. On the sidewalk corners are spacious cob benches (with roofs), a children’s playhouse woven from tree branches and found materials, a beehive-shaped dispensary for the monthly neighborhood newsletter The Bee, a 24/7 Tea Station, and the first-ever “Little Free Library”, an innovation which has now gone viral around the world.

Peak Moment - The Open Source Seed Initiative - Protecting Our Food Commons

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Plant breeder Carol Deppe is passionate about making seeds available for all growers, rather than being in the control of a handful of corporations. “If we want to control the kind of food available and the kind of agricultural system that we want, we have to do our own breeding,” she explains. “What Open Source Seed Initiative (OSSI) does is create a pool, a protected commons, of germ plasm which will always be available for breeding. The OSSI pledge goes along with these seed varieties, but also if you breed new varieties.

Peak Moment - Ecovillages - A Leading Edge for Sustainability

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What might ecovillages show us about living sustainably? Political science professor Karen Litfin visited fourteen ecovillages in both developing and developed countries. The author of Ecovillages: Lessons for Sustainable Community looked for commonalities among such communities, whose intention is to live sustainably. Looking through the lenses of ecology, economics, community and consciousness, she found they share a common worldview: The web of life is sacred, and we’re part of that web.